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Frequency: 93.3
Call Letters: KMXV
City of License: Kansas City, MO
Format: CHR "Mix 93.3"
HD2:

Owner: Steel City Media
HAAT/ERP: 1127ft/100kw
Coverage: Excellent
http://www.mix93.com
Featured Media
  • KLSI logo from 1984 Christmas LP
  • KMXV current logo

  • KWKI 1982 legal ID


    KLSI montage July 1983


    KMXV 1992 promo


    KMXV 1994 promo


    KMXV 1999 legal ID


    KMXV 2008 legal ID


    1958-1963 - KCMK - Classical
    KCMK signed on March 5, 1958, with 35,000 watts of power. KCMK broadcast classical and some MOR music.

    1963-1965 - KCMK - Country
    A fellow named Archie Mash owned the station. The studios were in the basement of the St. Regis Hotel at Paseo and Linwood, with the tower on top of the building. An interesting story from a fan of the station's early days - a little before Patsy Cline's death, KCMK had hired away an announcer named Cactus Jack Call, who two weeks later died in a car crash. Cline died in a plane crash on her way to Nashville from Kansas City. She had been playing a benefit concert for Call's widow and family.

    1965-1965 - KCMK - Variety
    For a brief period in mid-1965, KCMK called itself the "oasis in a musical desert." They soon returned to country.

    1965-1969 - KCMK - Country
    In 1967, the station was bought by FM Broadcasters (not the same company as today). They built new studios in the Landing shopping center.

    1969-1971 - KCMK - R&B/Soul/Motown
    KCMK competed with KPRS briefly, starting September 1969.

    1971-1973 - KWKI - Country
    After a sale to the Communications Fund, country returned to 93.3 mHz in November 1971. KWKI also used the AFM network.

    1973-1974 - KWKI - Top 40
    After ditching the country for the final time, there was a brief period of Top 40.

    1974-1978 - KWKI - Progressive Rock - "Quickie / "93 Rock"
    In 1974, KWKI kind of picked up where KBEY and KCJC left off. But they lost ground in the late 1970s when KYYS became incredibly popular. A sale to the Jimmy Swaggart Ministries ended the format.

    1978-1982 - KWKI - Religious
    The first full day of religious programming was December 11, 1978. In 1980, KWKI upgraded to 100,000 watts.

    1982-1991 - KLSI - Soft Adult Contemporary - "Classy 93 / Mix 93"
    In 1982, Great Plains Radio bought KWKI, entering the crowded soft music club in the process. KWKI started as "The New 93" in May 1982, but soon adopted the "Classy" moniker. The FCC approved the call letters KLSI on July 4, 1982. By the late 1980s, KLSI dropped the "Classy" name, referring to itself by call letters. Apollo Broadcasting bought the station in 1990.

    1991-1994 - KMXV - Adult Contemporary - "Mix 93"
    KMXV was just a continuation of KLSI, but with a slightly more upbeat playlist and new call letters.

    1994-current - KMXV - CHR "Mix 93.3"
    In March 1994, KMXV evolved into a CHR station. Mix 93.3 started off with a decidedly dance lean, and it was a good time to change formats too. At this time, Kansas City had exactly one CHR station, which most of the city couldn't hear, and it was a station months away from becoming modern rock anyway. So KMXV probably made the smartest move of the decade. Regent bought KMXV in 1995, and Jacor bought it in 1997. Almost immediately, American Radio Systems took over Jacor. CBS bought the station in 1998. As the years went on, the playlist became more rock-leaning, but KMXV climbed to the top of Arbitron ratings briefly. In 2006, Wilks Broadcasting bought the station.

    KMXV's ratings have varied over the years. The station often placed near the top in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Late in the decade, KMXV dropped back to the middle of the pack. The PPM universe gave KCHZ a bump after it altered its playlist to mainstream CHR. KMXV shot back up to the top of the ratings in 2011. Steel City Media agreed to buy the station in 2014.